clear


clear
clear adj 1 Clear, transparent, translucent, lucid, pellucid, diaphanous, limpid are comparable when they mean having the property of being literally or figuratively seen through.
Something is clear which is free from all such impediments to the vision as clouds, mist, or haze
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clear air

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a clear day

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or from muddiness, cloudiness, or turbidity
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clear glass

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clear crystals

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the launch moved slowly through water clear as air— Nordhoff & Hall

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or from obscurity, vagueness, or indistinctness of any sort
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clear thinking

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a clear mind

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a clear style

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a clear vision of reality— Conrad

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Something is transparent which is either so clear or so thin that objects can be easily seen or perceived through it
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the water ... is as transparent as the air, so that the stones and sand at the bottom seem, as it were, trembling in the light of noonday— Shelley

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transparent gauze

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guavas, with the shadows of their crimson pulp flushing through a transparent skin— Melville

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rushing away from the discussion on the transparent pretense of quieting the dog— Conrad

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his writings . . . are so flat, so transparent, so palpably taken from the nearest authorities— H. O. Taylor

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Something is translucent which admits the passage of light through it but which does not permit a clear sight of what lies beyond
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frosted glass is translucent

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under the glassy, cool, translucent wave— Milton

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translucent amber that cages flies— Wylie

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translucent phrases, which mirror ... the woodland lights and shadows— L. P. Smith

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Something is lucid (see CLEAR 2) which is both transparent and luminous; this use is chiefly literary
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gods, who haunt the lucid interspace of world and world where never creeps a cloud, or moves a wind— Tennyson

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the thought may be obscure, but the word is lucid, or rather translucent— T. S. Eliot

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Something is pellucid which is clear as crystal
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more pellucid streams, an ampler ether, a diviner air— Wordsworth

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[Goldsmith's] pellucid simplicity— Harrison

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Something is diaphanous which is so delicate and gossamerlike in texture that it is almost transparent or is actually translucent
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a diaphanous veil

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I like diaphanous illusions, with the shapes of things as they are showing not too faintly through them— L. P. Smith

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Something is limpid which has the soft clearness of or as if of pure water
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the whole atmosphere has a luminous serenity, a limpid clearness— Ward

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that . . . simple, limpid style which is the supreme style of all— Arnold

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Archer's New York ... in busi-ness matters . . . exacted a limpid and impeccable honesty— Wharton

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Analogous words: *bright, luminous: *liquid: *pure, sheer
Antonyms: turbid: confused
Contrasted words: dim, obscure, murky, dusky, gloomy (see DARK): muddy, roily (see TURBID): muddled, addled, fuddled, befuddled (see CONFUSE)
2 Clear, perspicuous, lucid are comparable, as used in reference to qualities of thought or style with the meaning, quickly and easily understood.
Clear implies freedom from obscurity, ambiguity, or the danger of being misunderstood
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"many are called," there is a clear truth: "few are chosen," there is an obscure truth— Arnold

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there are more obscure poems written and printed every year than clear ones— R. B. West

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Perspicuous lays more stress than clear upon the medium of expression regarded for itself; it frequently connotes a certain simplicity and elegance of style
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extreme conciseness of expression, yet pure, perspicuous, and musical, is one of the grand beauties of lyric poetry— Gray

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the ode is not wholly perspicuous. Wordsworth himself seems to have thought it difficult— Trilling

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Lucid especially implies clearness of order or arrangement
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he thought little of recasting a chapter in order to obtain a more lucid arrangement— G. O. Trevelyan

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his descriptions of the most complicated organic structures are astonishingly lucidHuxley

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Analogous words: express, *explicit, definite: *graphic, vivid: clear- cut, *incisive, trenchant
Antonyms: unintelligible: abstruse
Contrasted words: vague, *obscure, ambiguous, equivocal, cryptic, enigmatic: turgid, tumid (see INFLATED): *recondite, occult, esoteric
3 manifest, *evident, obvious, distinct, apparent, patent, palpable, plain
Contrasted words: *doubtful, dubious, questionable, problematic
clear vb *rid, unburden, disabuse, purge
Analogous words: *free, release, liberate, deliver: *clean, cleanse: eliminate, rule out (see EXCLUDE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • clear — [klir] adj. [ME cler < OFr < L clarus, orig., clear sounding, hence clear, bright: for IE base see CLAMOR] 1. free from clouds or mist; bright; light [a clear day] 2. free from cloudiness, muddiness, etc.; transparent or pure; not turbid [a …   English World dictionary

  • Clear — (kl[=e]r), a. [Compar. {Clearer} ( [ e]r); superl. {Clearest}.] [OE. cler, cleer, OF. cler, F. clair, fr.L. clarus, clear, bright, loud, distinct, renowned; perh. akin to L. clamare to call, E. claim. Cf. {Chanticleer}, {Clairvoyant}, {Claret},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Clear — may refer to: Contents 1 Music 2 Business 3 Technology 4 …   Wikipedia

  • clear — adj 1: unencumbered by outstanding claims or interests a search showed the title was clear 2: free from doubt or ambiguity Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • Clear — Clear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cleared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Clearing}.] 1. To render bright, transparent, or undimmed; to free from clouds. [1913 Webster] He sweeps the skies and clears the cloudy north. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To free from… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clear — ► ADJECTIVE 1) easy to perceive or understand. 2) leaving or feeling no doubt. 3) transparent; unclouded. 4) free of obstructions or unwanted objects. 5) (of a period of time) free of commitments. 6) free from disease, contamination, or guilt. 7) …   English terms dictionary

  • clear — [adj1] cloudless, bright clarion, crystal, fair, fine, halcyon, light, luminous, pleasant, rainless, shining, shiny, sunny, sunshiny, unclouded, undarkened, undimmed; concepts 525,617,627 Ant. cloudy, dark, dim, dull, fuzzy, gloomy, shadowy,… …   New thesaurus

  • clear — clear; clear·age; clear·ance; clear·ly; clear·ness; clear·starch; un·clear; clear·cole; clear·er; clear·head·ed·ly; un·clear·ly; un·clear·ness; …   English syllables

  • clear — clear, clearly The grammatical situation is similar to that in the preceding entry, with clear available as an adverb in two principal meanings, (1) ‘completely’ (They got clear away), (2) ‘in a clear manner, with clear effect’ (They spoke out… …   Modern English usage

  • clear up — {v.} 1. To make plain or clear; explain; solve. * /The teacher cleared up the harder parts of the story./ * /Maybe we can clear up your problem./ 2. To become clear. * /The weather cleared up after the storm./ 3. To cure. * /The pills cleared up… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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